Loading...
 Home  About the Journal Editorial Board Aims & Scope Peer Review Policy Subscription Contact us
 
Early Edition  //  Current Issue  //  Open Special Issues  //  Archives  //  Most Read  //  Most Downloaded  //  Most Cited
Cover Illustration
2014, Vol.5  No.3
Accumulating evidence has revealed that thePI3K/AKT/PTENpathway acts as a pivotal determinant of cell fate regarding senescence and apoptosis, which is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. NADPH oxidase (NOX) family of enzymes generates the ROS. The regulation of NOX enzymes is complex, with many members of this family exhibiting complexity in terms of subunit composition, cellular location, and tissue-specific expression. Cells are continuously exposed to the ROS, which represent mutagens and are thought to be a major contributor to several diseases including cancer and aging process. Therefore, cellular ROS sensing and metabolism are firmly regulated by a variety of proteins involved in the redox mechanism. In this review, the roles of oxidative stress in PI3K/AKT/PTEN signaling are summarized with a focus [Detail] ...

ISSN 2152-5250
Since 2010
2019 impact factor: 5.402
  About the Journal
    » About Journal
    » Editorial Board
    » Indexed in
  Authors
    » Online Submission
    » Guidelines for Authors
    » Download Templates
    » Copyright Agreement
  Reviewers
    » Guidelines for Reviewers
    » Online Peer Review
    » Online Editor Work
  Editorial Office
  • Table of Content
      10 May 2014, Volume 5 Issue 3 Previous Issue    Next Issue
    For Selected: View Abstracts Toggle Thumbnails
    Raised Serum Proinflammatory Cytokines in Alzheimer’s Disease with Depression
    Vineet Kumar Khemka,Anirban Ganguly,Debajit Bagchi,Arindam Ghosh,Aritri Bir,Atanu Biswas,Sita Chattopadhyay,Sasanka Chakrabarti
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (3): 170-176.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500170
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 1476 )

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the changes in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines like IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in peripheral circulation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) subjects and to correlate these with associated depression and cognitive deficit. Fifty five AD subjects and thirty seven age and sex matched controls were included in the study. The AD patients were grouped as AD with depression (n= 31) and AD without depression (n= 24). The serum levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were determined by immunoassay by commercially available kits. The serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were elevated in AD patients with depression compared to control (p<0.001) or AD without depression (p<0.001). The serum level of IL-1β was higher in AD patients with or without depression as compared to controls. Furthermore, a strong inverse correlation was observed between the MMSE scores and serum levels of IL-6 or TNF-α in AD subjects with depression. The study highlights the important role of peripheral IL-6 and TNF-α in AD associated depression and cognitive deficits.

    References | Related Articles | Metrics
    Hip Fractures in a Geriatric Population - Rehabilitation Based on Patients Needs
    Natasa Radosavljevic,Dejan Nikolic,Milica Lazovic,Aleksandar Jeremic
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (3): 177-182.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500177
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 1116 )

    With an increased life expectancy in humans and thus an increase in the number of the elderly population, the frequency of hip fractures will rise as well. Aside from a higher incidence, hip fractures in a geriatric population is a significant problem due to the possible onset of severe and in some cases dramatic complications and consequences. The primary purpose of treatment and rehabilitation in the elderly after a hip fracture is to improve an individual’s quality of life. It is important to underline that principles and methods of functional restoration after hip fracture should consider careful planning of a rehabilitation program individually for every patient and its implementation with respect to decisions made by the rehabilitation team.

    References | Related Articles | Metrics
    Strength and Endurance Training Prescription in Healthy and Frail Elderly
    Eduardo Lusa Cadore,Ronei Silveira Pinto,Martim Bottaro,Mikel Izquierdo
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (3): 183-195.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500183
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 1753 )

    Aging is associated with declines in the neuromuscular and cardiovascular systems, resulting in an impaired capacity to perform daily activities. Frailty is an age-associated biological syndrome characterized by decreases in the biological functional reserve and resistance to stressors due to changes in several physiological systems, which puts older individuals at special risk of disability. To counteract the neuromuscular and cardiovascular declines associated with aging, as well as to prevent and treat the frailty syndrome, the strength and endurance training seems to be an effective strategy to improve muscle hypertrophy, strength and power output, as well as endurance performance. The first purpose of this review was discuss the neuromuscular adaptations to strength training, as well as the cardiovascular adaptations to endurance training in healthy and frail elderly subjects. In addition, the second purpose of this study was investigate the concurrent training adaptations in the elderly. Based on the results found, the combination of strength and endurance training (i.e., concurrent training) performed at moderate volume and moderate to high intensity in elderly populations is the most effective way to improve both neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory functions. Moreover, exercise interventions that include muscle power training should be prescribed to frail elderly in order to improve the overall physical status of this population and prevent disability.

    References | Related Articles | Metrics
    Aging Is Not a Disease: Implications for Intervention
    Suresh I. S. Rattan
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (3): 196-202.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500196
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 1341 )

    Aging of biological systems occurs in spite of numerous complex pathways of maintenance, repair and defense. There are no gerontogenes which have the specific evolutionary function to cause aging. Although aging is the common cause of all age-related diseases, aging in itself cannot be considered a disease. This understanding of aging as a process should transform our approach towards interventions from developing illusory anti-aging treatments to developing realistic and practical methods for maintaining health throughout the lifespan. The concept of homeodynamic space can be a useful one in order to identify a set of measurable, evidence-based and demonstratable parameters of health, robustness and resilience. Age-induced health problems, for which there are no other clear-cut causative agents, may be better tackled by focusing on health mechanisms and their maintenance, rather than only disease management and treatment. Continuing the disease-oriented research and treatment approaches, as opposed to health-oriented and preventive strategies, are economically, socially and psychologically unsustainable.

    References | Related Articles | Metrics
    Link between PI3K/AKT/PTEN Pathway and NOX Proteinin Diseases
    Atsuko Nakanishi,Yoko Wada,Yasuko Kitagishi,Satoru Matsuda
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (3): 203-211.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500203
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 998 )

    Accumulating evidence has revealed that thePI3K/AKT/PTENpathway acts as a pivotal determinant of cell fate regarding senescence and apoptosis, which is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. NADPH oxidase (NOX) family of enzymes generates the ROS. The regulation of NOX enzymes is complex, with many members of this family exhibiting complexity in terms of subunit composition, cellular location, and tissue-specific expression. Cells are continuously exposed to the ROS, which represent mutagens and are thought to be a major contributor to several diseases including cancer and aging process. Therefore, cellular ROS sensing and metabolism are firmly regulated by a variety of proteins involved in the redox mechanism. In this review, the roles of oxidative stress in PI3K/AKT/PTEN signaling are summarized with a focus on the links between the pathways and NOX protein in several diseases including cancer and aging.

    References | Related Articles | Metrics
    Lifestyle and Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) Burden: Its Relevance to Healthy Aging
    Chandan Prasad,Victorine Imrhan,Francesco Marotta,Shanil Juma,Parakat Vijayagopal
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (3): 212-217.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500212
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 1032 )

    Uncontrolled continued exposure to oxidative stress is a precursor to many chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, degenerative disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Of the many known mediators of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are the most studied. In the present review, we have summarized current data on the origin of circulating AGEs, discussed issues associated with reliable assessment of its steady state level, and changes in its level with age and select metabolic diseases. Lastly, we have made recommendations about life style changes that may decrease AGEs burden to promote healthy aging.

    References | Related Articles | Metrics
  Submit Manuscript
User ID:
Password:
  Editors-in-Chief  
Kunlin Jin, M.D., Ph.D., Professor
Ashok K. Shetty, Ph.D., Professor
David A. Greenberg, M.D., Ph.D., Professor
  News More  
» FoxN1-Regulating miRNAs Associated with Thymic Aging
  2017-01-26
» Journal Rank
  2020-06-30
» H-index of Aging and Disease
  2020-06-30
» 2016 ICAD
  2015-08-17
» Impact factor
  2020-06-30
» Science Daily-12/23/2010
  2015-04-09
» 2014 International Conference on Aging and Disease (ICAD 2014) was held in Beijing
  2014-11-05
» About ISOAD
  2014-09-01


  Journal Indexing   




Copyright © 2014 Aging and Disease, All Rights Reserved.
Address: Aging and Disease Editorial Office 3400 Camp Bowie Boulevard Fort Worth, TX76106 USA
Fax: (817) 735-0408 E-mail: editorial@aginganddisease.org
Powered by Beijing Magtech Co. Ltd