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2014, Vol.5  No.4
The TOR (target of rapamycin) pathway has been convincingly shown to promote aging in various model organisms. In mice, inhibiting mTOR (mammalian TOR) by rapamycin treatment later in life can significantly extend lifespan and mitigate multiple age-related diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Cellular senescence is strongly correlated to organismal aging therefore providing an attractive model to examine the mechanisms by which mTOR inhibition contributes to longevity and delaying the onset of related diseases. In this review, we examine the connections between mTOR and cellular senescence and discuss how understanding cellular senescence on the aspect of mTOR signaling may help to fully appreciate its role in the organismal aging. We also highlight the opposing roles of senescence in various human diseases [Detail] ...

ISSN 2152-5250
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2015 impact factor: 3.697
5 year impact factor: 3.602
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  • Table of Content
      Jul. 2014, Volume 5 Issue 4 Previous Issue    Next Issue
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    Estimation of Heterogeneity in Diagnostic Parameters of Age-related Diseases
    David Blokh,Ilia Stambler
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (4): 218-225.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500218
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 852 )

    The heterogeneity of parameters is a ubiquitous biological phenomenon, with critical implications for biological systems functioning in normal and diseased states. We developed a method to estimate the level of objects set heterogeneity with reference to particular parameters and applied it to type II diabetes and heart disease, as examples of age-related systemic dysfunctions. The Friedman test was used to establish the existence of heterogeneity. The Newman-Keuls multiple comparison method was used to determine clusters. The normalized Shannon entropy was used to provide the quantitative evaluation of heterogeneity. There was obtained an estimate for the heterogeneity of the diagnostic parameters in healthy subjects, as well as in heart disease and type II diabetes patients, which was strongly related to their age. With aging, as with the diseases, the level of heterogeneity (entropy) was reduced, indicating a formal analogy between these phenomena. The similarity of the patterns in aging and disease suggested a kind of “early aging” of the diseased subjects, or alternatively a “disease-like” aging process, with reference to these particular parameters. The proposed method and its validation on the chronic age-related disease samples may support a way toward a formal mathematical relation between aging and chronic diseases and a formal definition of aging and disease, as determined by particular heterogeneity (entropy) changes.

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    Managing Sarcopenia and Its Related-Fractures to Improve Quality of Life in Geriatric Populations
    Tetsuro Hida,Atsushi Harada,Shiro Imagama,Naoki Ishiguro
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (4): 226-237.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500226
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 719 )

    Sarcopenia, an aging-induced generalized decrease in muscle mass, strength, and function, is known to affect elderly individuals by decreasing mobile function and increasing frailty and imbalance that lead to falls and fragile fractures. Sarcopenia is a known risk factor for osteoporotic fractures, infections, and early death in some specific situations. The number of patients with sarcopenia is estimated to increase to 500 million people in the year 2050. Sarcopenia is believed to be caused by multiple factors such as disuse, malnutrition, age-related cellular changes, apoptosis, and genetic predisposition; however, this remains to be determined. Various methods have been developed, but no safe or effective treatment has been found to date. This paper is a review on the association between sarcopenia and its related-fractures and their diagnoses and management methods to prevent fractures.

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    Metabolic Disturbances in Diseases with Neurological Involvement
    João M. N. Duarte,Patrícia F. Schuck,Gary L. Wenk,Gustavo C. Ferreira
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (4): 238-255.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500238
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 504 )

    Degeneration of specific neuronal populations and progressive nervous system dysfunction characterize neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. These findings are also reported in inherited diseases such as phenylketonuria and glutaric aciduria type I. The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in these diseases was reported, elicited by genetic alterations, exogenous toxins or buildup of toxic metabolites. In this review we shall discuss some metabolic alterations related to the pathophysiology of diseases with neurological involvement and aging process. These findings may help identifying early disease biomarkers and lead to more effective therapies to improve the quality of life of the patients affected by these devastating illnesses.

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    Accelerated Aging in Schizophrenia Patients: The Potential Role of Oxidative Stress
    Olaoluwa O Okusaga
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (4): 256-262.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500256
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 878 )

    Several lines of evidence suggest that schizophrenia, a severe mental illness characterized by delusions, hallucinations and thought disorder is associated with accelerated aging. The free radical (oxidative stress) theory of aging assumes that aging occurs as a result of damage to cell constituents and connective tissues by free radicals arising from oxygen-associated reactions. Schizophrenia has been associated with oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, both of which also appear to reciprocally induce each other in a positive feedback manner. The buildup of damaged macromolecules due to increased oxidative stress and failure of protein repair and maintenance systems is an indicator of aging both at the cellular and organismal level. When compared with age-matched healthy controls, schizophrenia patients have higher levels of markers of oxidative cellular damage such as protein carbonyls, products of lipid peroxidation and DNA hydroxylation. Potential confounders such as antipsychotic medication, smoking, socio-economic status and unhealthy lifestyle make it impossible to solely attribute the earlier onset of aging-related changes or oxidative stress to having a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Regardless of whether oxidative stress can be attributed solely to a diagnosis of schizophrenia or whether it is due to other factors associated with schizophrenia, the available evidence is in support of increased oxidative stress-induced cellular damage of macromolecules which may play a role in the phenomenon of accelerated aging presumed to be associated with schizophrenia.

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    mTOR Signaling from Cellular Senescence to Organismal Aging
    Shaohua Xu,Ying Cai,Yuehua Wei
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (4): 263-273.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500263
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 1113 )

    The TOR (target of rapamycin) pathway has been convincingly shown to promote aging in various model organisms. In mice, inhibiting mTOR (mammalian TOR) by rapamycin treatment later in life can significantly extend lifespan and mitigate multiple age-related diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Cellular senescence is strongly correlated to organismal aging therefore providing an attractive model to examine the mechanisms by which mTOR inhibition contributes to longevity and delaying the onset of related diseases. In this review, we examine the connections between mTOR and cellular senescence and discuss how understanding cellular senescence on the aspect of mTOR signaling may help to fully appreciate its role in the organismal aging. We also highlight the opposing roles of senescence in various human diseases and discuss the caveats in interpreting the emerging experimental data.

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    Effects of Living at Higher Altitudes on Mortality: A Narrative Review
    Martin Burtscher
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (4): 274-280.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500274
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 728 )

    Beside genetic and life-style characteristics environmental factors may profoundly influence mortality and life expectancy. The high altitude climate comprises a set of conditions bearing the potential of modifying morbidity and mortality of approximately 400 million people who are permanently residing at elevations above 1500 meters. However, epidemiological data on the effects of high altitude living on mortality from major diseases are inconsistent probably due to differences in ethnicity, behavioral factors and the complex interactions with environmental conditions. The available data indicate that residency at higher altitudes are associated with lower mortality from cardiovascular diseases, stroke and certain types of cancer. In contrast mortality from COPD and probably also from lower respiratory tract infections is rather elevated. It may be argued that moderate altitudes are more protective than high or even very high altitudes. Whereas living at higher elevations may frequently protect from development of diseases, it could adversely affect mortality when diseases progress. Corroborating and expanding these findings would be helpful for optimization of medical care and disease management in the aging residents of higher altitudes.

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    Nothobranchius as a model for aging studies. A review
    Alejandro Lucas-Sánchez,Pedro Francisco Almaida-Pagán,Pilar Mendiola,Jorge de Costa
    Aging and Disease. 2014, 5 (4): 281-291.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2014.0500281
    Abstract   HTML   PDF (0KB) ( 780 )

    In recent decades, the increase in human longevity has made it increasingly important to expand our knowledge on aging. To accomplish this, the use of animal models is essential, with the most common being mouse (phylogenetically similar to humans, and a model with a long life expectancy) and Caenorhabditis elegans (an invertebrate with a short life span, but quite removed from us in evolutionary terms). However, some sort of model is needed to bridge the differences between those mentioned above, achieving a balance between phylogenetic distance and life span. Fish of the genus Nothobranchius were suggested 10 years ago as a possible alternative for the study of the aging process. In the meantime, numerous studies have been conducted at different levels: behavioral (including the study of the rest-activity rhythm), populational, histochemical, biochemical and genetic, among others, with very positive results. This review compiles what we know about Nothobranchius to date, and examines its future prospects as a true alternative to the classic models for studies on aging.

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  Editors-in-Chief  
Kunlin Jin, M.D., Ph.D., Professor
Ashok K. Shetty, Ph.D., Professor
David A. Greenberg, M.D., Ph.D., Professor
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