Home  About the Journal Editorial Board Aims & Scope Peer Review Policy Subscription Contact us
 
Early Edition  //  Current Issue  //  Open Special Issues  //  Archives  //  Most Read  //  Most Downloaded  //  Most Cited

ISSN 2152-5250
Since 2010
2017 impact factor: 5.058
  About the Journal
    » About Journal
    » Editorial Board
    » Indexed in
  Authors
    » Online Submission
    » Guidelines for Authors
    » Download Templates
    » Copyright Agreement
  Reviewers
    » Guidelines for Reviewers
    » Online Peer Review
    » Online Editor Work
  Editorial Office
Top Read Articles
Published in last 1 year |  In last 2 years |  In last 3 years |  All
Please wait a minute...
For Selected: View Abstracts Toggle Thumbnails
Predictors of Memory in Healthy Aging: Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Balance and Fornix White Matter Integrity
Marta K. Zamroziewicz,Erick J. Paul,Chris E. Zwilling,Aron K. Barbey
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (4): 372-383.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0501
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1195KB)

Recent evidence demonstrates that age and disease-related decline in cognition depends not only upon degeneration in brain structure and function, but also on dietary intake and nutritional status. Memory, a potential preclinical marker of Alzheimer’s disease, is supported by white matter integrity in the brain and dietary patterns high in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, the extent to which memory is supported by specific omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and the degree to which this relationship is reliant upon microstructure of particular white matter regions is not known. This study therefore examined the cross-sectional relationship between empirically-derived patterns of omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (represented by nutrient biomarker patterns), memory, and regional white matter microstructure in healthy, older adults. We measured thirteen plasma phospholipid omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, memory, and regional white matter microstructure in 94 cognitively intact older adults (65 to 75 years old). A three-step mediation analysis was implemented using multivariate linear regressions, adjusted for age, gender, education, income, depression status, and body mass index. The mediation analysis revealed that a mixture of plasma phospholipid omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids is linked to memory and that white matter microstructure of the fornix fully mediates the relationship between this pattern of plasma phospholipid polyunsaturated fatty acids and memory. These results suggest that memory may be optimally supported by a balance of plasma phospholipid omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids through the preservation of fornix white matter microstructure in cognitively intact older adults. This report provides novel evidence for the benefits of plasma phospholipid omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid balance on memory and underlying white matter microstructure.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
A Comprehensive Review of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Use in The Elderly
Supakanya Wongrakpanich,Amaraporn Wongrakpanich,Katie Melhado,Janani Rangaswami
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (1): 143-150.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0306
Abstract   HTML   PDF (874KB)

NSAIDs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, are one of the most commonly prescribed pain medications. It is a highly effective drug class for pain and inflammation; however, NSAIDs are known for multiple adverse effects, including gastrointestinal bleeding, cardiovascular side effects, and NSAID induced nephrotoxicity. As our society ages, it is crucial to have comprehensive knowledge of this class of medication in the elderly population. Therefore, we reviewed the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, current guidelines for NSAIDs use, adverse effect profile, and drug interaction of NSAIDs and commonly used medications in the elderly.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Recognizing Degenerative Aging as a Treatable Medical Condition: Methodology and Policy
Ilia Stambler
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (5): 583-589.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0130
Abstract   HTML   PDF (789KB)

It is becoming increasingly clear that in order to accomplish healthy longevity for the population, there is an urgent need for the research and development of effective therapies against degenerative aging processes underlying major aging-related diseases, including heart disease, neurodegenerative diseases, type 2 diabetes, cancer, pulmonary obstructive diseases, as well as aging-related complications and susceptibilities of infectious communicable diseases. Yet, an important incentive for the research and development of such therapies appears to be the development of clinically applicable and scientifically grounded definitions and criteria for the multifactorial degenerative aging process (or “senility” using the existing ICD category), underlying those diseases, as well as for the safety and effectiveness of interventions against it. Such generally agreed definitions and criteria are currently absent. The devising of such criteria is important not only for the sake of their scientific value and their utility for the development of therapeutic solutions for the aging population, but also to comply with and implement major existing national and international programmatic and regulatory requirements. Some methodological suggestions and potential pitfalls for the development of such criteria are examined.

Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Acute Sarcopenia Secondary to Hospitalisation - An Emerging Condition Affecting Older Adults
Carly Welch,Zaki K. Hassan-Smith,Carolyn A. Greig,Janet M. Lord,Thomas A. Jackson
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (1): 151-164.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0315
Abstract   HTML   PDF (837KB)

There has been increasing interest and research into sarcopenia in community-dwelling older adults since the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) agreed a consensus definition in 2010. Sarcopenia has been defined as loss of muscle mass with loss of muscle function (strength or physical performance), with measurements two Standard Deviations (SDs) below the mean of a young reference population. This definition does not necessitate longitudinal measurements, or the absence of acute illness and diagnosis can be made from single measurements. We hypothesise that hospitalisation, due to a combination of acute inflammatory burden and muscle disuse, leads to an acute decline in muscle mass and function and may lead to some individuals meeting criteria for sarcopenia, acutely, based on the EWGSOP definition. This may be partially recoverable or may lead to increased risk of developing sarcopenia long-term. We have denoted the term “acute sarcopenia” to refer to acute loss of muscle mass and function associated with hospitalisation. This review discusses some of the current available research in this context and also identifies some of the knowledge gaps and potential areas for future research.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Evaluation of the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability in Elderly Patients with Pneumonia
Yasuo Chojin,Tatsuji Kato,Mariko Rikihisa,Masami Omori,Shingo Noguchi,Kentaro Akata,Takaaki Ogoshi,Kazuhiro Yatera,Hiroshi Mukae
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (4): 420-433.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0102
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1178KB)

Elderly pneumonia patients have various underlying diseases and social backgrounds, and it is difficult to predict their mortality using the current severity assessment tools. However, aspiration is a risk factor for mortality in pneumonia patients. In the evaluation of aspiration, endoscopic and video fluoroscopic methods are reliable but cannot be performed in all pneumonia patients. We evaluated the significance of the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA) in these patients. This study was prospectively performed between December 2014 and June 2015, and all adult hospitalized patients with pneumonia were consecutively enrolled. The MASA score was evaluated soon after admission. The outcome measures were in-hospital mortality, a recurrence of pneumonia within 30 days, 6-month mortality, and the detection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A total of 153 patients were ultimately included. The proportion of in-hospital mortality was greater among the severe MASA score patients than normal score patients (p < 0.01), as was the proportion of recurrence of pneumonia (p < 0.01) and 6-month mortality (p < 0.01). In addition, patients with a moderate MASA score more often experienced recurrence of pneumonia than normal score patients (p < 0.05). Furthermore, patients with a mild MASA score more often experienced recurrence of pneumonia (p < 0.01) and 6-month mortality (p < 0.05) than normal score patients. The areas under the curve were 0.74 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.82) for in-hospital mortality, 0.75 (95% CI, 0.68-0.82) for recurrence of pneumonia, 0.72 (95% Cl, 0.64-0.81) for 6-month mortality, and 0.60 (95% CI, 0.46-0.73) for detection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A multivariate analysis showed an abnormal MASA score to be an independent risk factor for the recurrence of pneumonia (p = 0.001) and 6-month mortality (p = 0.005). The MASA is useful for predicting the mortality and recurrence of pneumonia in elderly patients.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
The Biology of Aging and Cancer: A Brief Overview of Shared and Divergent Molecular Hallmarks
Jan R. Aunan,William C Cho,Kjetil Søreide
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (5): 628-642.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0103
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1005KB)

Aging is the inevitable time-dependent decline in physiological organ function and is a major risk factor for cancer development. Due to advances in health care, hygiene control and food availability, life expectancy is increasing and the population in most developed countries is shifting to an increasing proportion of people at a cancer susceptible age. Mechanisms of aging are also found to occur in carcinogenesis, albeit with shared or divergent end-results. It is now clear that aging and cancer development either share or diverge in several disease mechanisms. Such mechanisms include the role of genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic changes, loss of proteostasis, decreased nutrient sensing and altered metabolism, but also cellular senescence and stem cell function. Cancer cells and aged cells are also fundamentally opposite, as cancer cells can be thought of as hyperactive cells with advantageous mutations, rapid cell division and increased energy consumption, while aged cells are hypoactive with accumulated disadvantageous mutations, cell division inability and a decreased ability for energy production and consumption. Nonetheless, aging and cancer are tightly interconnected and many of the same strategies and drugs may be used to target both, while in other cases antagonistic pleiotrophy come into effect and inhibition of one can be the activation of the other. Cancer can be considered an aging disease, though the shared mechanisms underpinning the two processes remain unclear. Better understanding of the shared and divergent pathways of aging and cancer is needed.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Role of Dietary Protein and Muscular Fitness on Longevity and Aging
Barbara Strasser,Konstantinos Volaklis,Dietmar Fuchs,Martin Burtscher
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (1): 119-132.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0202
Abstract   HTML   PDF (936KB)

Muscle atrophy is an unfortunate effect of aging and many diseases and can compromise physical function and impair vital metabolic processes. Low levels of muscular fitness together with insufficient dietary intake are major risk factors for illness and mortality from all causes. Ultimately, muscle wasting contributes significantly to weakness, disability, increased hospitalization, immobility, and loss of independence. However, the extent of muscle wasting differs greatly between individuals due to differences in the aging process per se as well as physical activity levels. Interventions for sarcopenia include exercise and nutrition because both have a positive impact on protein anabolism but also enhance other aspects that contribute to well-being in sarcopenic older adults, such as physical function, quality of life, and anti-inflammatory state. The process of aging is accompanied by chronic immune activation, and sarcopenia may represent a consequence of a counter-regulatory strategy of the immune system. Thereby, the kynurenine pathway is induced, and elevation in the ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan concentrations, which estimates the tryptophan breakdown rate, is often linked with inflammatory conditions and neuropsychiatric symptoms. A combined exercise program consisting of both resistance-type and endurance-type exercise may best help to ameliorate the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, to prevent muscle aging comorbidities, and to improve physical performance and quality of life. In addition, the use of dietary protein supplementation can further augment protein anabolism but can also contribute to a more active lifestyle, thereby supporting well-being and active aging in the older population.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
CLARITY for High-resolution Imaging and Quantification of Vasculature in the Whole Mouse Brain
Lin-Yuan Zhang,Pan Lin,Jiaji Pan,Yuanyuan Ma,Zhenyu Wei,Lu Jiang,Liping Wang,Yaying Song,Yongting Wang,Zhijun Zhang,Kunlin Jin,Qian Wang,Guo-Yuan Yang
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (2): 262-272.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0613
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1299KB)

Elucidating the normal structure and distribution of cerebral vascular system is fundamental for understanding its function. However, studies on visualization and whole-brain quantification of vasculature with cellular resolution are limited. Here, we explored the structure of vasculature at the whole-brain level using the newly developed CLARITY technique. Adult male C57BL/6J mice undergoing transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and Tie2-RFP transgenic mice were used. Whole mouse brains were extracted for CLARITY processing. Immunostaining was performed to label vessels. Customized MATLAB code was used for image processing and quantification. Three-dimensional images were visualized using the Vaa3D software. Our results showed that whole mouse brain became transparent using the CLARITY method. Three-dimensional imaging and visualization of vasculature were achieved at the whole-brain level with a 1-μm voxel resolution. The quantitative results showed that the fractional vascular volume was 0.018 ± 0.004 mm3 per mm3, the normalized vascular length was 0.44 ± 0.04 m per mm3, and the mean diameter of the microvessels was 4.25 ± 0.08 μm. Furthermore, a decrease in the fractional vascular volume and a decrease in the normalized vascular length were found in the penumbra of ischemic mice compared to controls (p < 0.05). In conclusion, CLARITY provides a novel approach for mapping vasculature in the whole mouse brain at cellular resolution. CLARITY-optimized algorithms facilitate the assessment of structural change in vasculature after brain injury.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
The Study of Rhabdomyolysis in the Elderly: An Epidemiological Study and Single Center Experience
Supakanya Wongrakpanich,Christos Kallis,Prithiv Prasad,Janani Rangaswami,Andrew Rosenzweig
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (1): 1-7.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0304
Abstract   HTML   PDF (650KB)

Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome caused by injury to skeletal muscle. There is limited data of rhabdomyolysis in the elderly. The objective of this study is to investigate demographic data, etiologies, laboratory values, prognostic factors, and mortality of rhabdomyolysis in the geriatric population. A 4-years retrospective chart review study was conducted. Our inclusion criteria were age above 65 years and creatinine kinase level excess five times of normal upper limit. Among 167 patients, 47.3% were male. The median age at diagnosis was 80.11 (66-101) years. The duration of follow up in the study ranged from 0 to 48 months. Fall (with or without immobilization) was the most frequent cause of rhabdomyolysis in 56.9%. The mean baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR), GFR at diagnosis, and peak decline in GFR was 76.94, 48.96, and 54.41 cc/min respectively. The mean CK at diagnosis and peak CK was 5097.22 and 6320.07. There were 45 deaths (21%) over the span of 4 years. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that number of medications pre-admission (Meds No.), peak decline in GFR, and acute kidney injury (AKI) are independent predictors for overall survival for rhabdomyolysis in the elderly. To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiological study of rhabdomyolysis in the elderly. Falls (with and without immobilization) were the most common etiology. Meds No. (>8), peak decline in GFR (<30 cc/min), and evidence of AKI are associated with shorter overall survival and can serve as potential independent prognostic markers for rhabdomyolysis in elderly patients.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Cancer and Aging - the Inflammatory Connection
Adar Zinger,William C Cho,Arie Ben-Yehuda
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (5): 611-627.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2016.1230
Abstract   HTML   PDF (852KB)

Aging and cancer are highly correlated biological phenomena. Various cellular processes such as DNA damage responses and cellular senescence that serve as tumor suppressing mechanisms throughout life result in degenerative changes and contribute to the aging phenotype. In turn, aging is considered a pro-tumorigenic state, and constitutes the single most important risk factor for cancer development. However, the causative relations between aging and cancer is not straight forward, as these processes carry contradictory hallmarks; While aging is characterized by tissue degeneration and organ loss of function, cancer is a state of sustained cellular proliferation and gain of new functions. Here, we review the molecular and cellular pathways that stand in the base of aging related cancer. Specifically, we deal with the inflammatory perspective that link these two processes, and suggest possible molecular targets that may be exploited to modify their courses.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Cardiovascular Risk Factors Are Correlated with Low Cognitive Function among Older Adults Across Europe Based on The SHARE Database
Joana Lourenco,Antonio Serrano,Alice Santos-Silva,Marcos Gomes,Claudia Afonso,Paula Freitas,Constanca Paul,Elisio Costa
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (1): 90-101.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0128
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1099KB)

Increased life expectancy is associated with a high prevalence of chronic, non-communicable diseases including cognitive decline and dementia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of cognitive impairment using three cognitive abilities (verbal fluency, numeracy and perceived memory) and their association with cardiovascular risk factors in seniors across Europe. Data from participants in wave 4 of the SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe) database was used. Cognitive performance in perceived memory, verbal fluency and numeracy was evaluated using simple tests and a memory complaints questionnaire. Clinical and sociodemographic variables were also studied for potential associations. Standardised prevalence rates of cognitive impairment based on age and gender were calculated by country. The prevalence of cognitive impairment was 28.02% for perceived memory, 27.89% for verbal fluency and 20.75% for numeracy throughout the 16 evaluated countries. Years of education, being a current or former smoker, number of chronic diseases, diabetes or hyperglycemia, heart attack and stroke were all independent variables associated with impairment in the three studied cognitive abilities. We also found independent associations between physical inactivity and verbal fluency and numeracy impairment, as well as hypertension and perceived memory impairment. Lower performance in the evaluated cognitive abilities and higher memory complaints are highly prevalent, have a heterogeneous distribution across Europe, and are associated with multiple factors, most of which are potentially preventable or treatable, especially cardiovascular risk factors.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Novel Modification of Potassium Chloride Induced Cardiac Arrest Model for Aged Mice
Huaqin Liu,Zhui Yu,Ying Li,Bin Xu,Baihui Yan,Wulf Paschen,David S Warner,Wei Yang,Huaxin Sheng
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (1): 31-39.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0221
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1158KB)

Experimental cardiac arrest (CA) in aging research is infrequently studied in part due to the limitation of animal models. We aimed to develop an easily performed mouse CA model to meet this need. A standard mouse KCl-induced CA model using chest compressions and intravenous epinephrine for resuscitation was modified by blood withdrawal prior to CA onset, so as to decrease the requisite KCl dose to induce CA by decreasing the circulating blood volume. The modification was then compared to the standard model in young adult mice subjected to 8 min CA. 22-month old mice were then subjected to 8 min CA, resuscitated, and compared to young adult mice. Post-CA functional recovery was evaluated by measuring spontaneous locomotor activity pre-injury, and on post-CA days 1, 2, and 3. Neurological score and brain histology were examined on day 3. Brain elF2α phosphorylation levels were measured at 1 h to verify tissue stress. Compared to the standard model, the modification decreased cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration and increased 3-day survival in young mice. For aged mice, survival was 100 % at 24 h and 54% at 72 h. Neurological deficit was present 3 days post-CA, although more severe versus young mice. Mild neuronal necrosis was present in the cortex and hippocampus. The modified model markedly induced elF2α phosphorylation in both age groups. This modified procedure makes the CA model feasible in aged mice and provides a practical platform for understanding injury mechanisms and developing therapeutics for elderly patients.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Mitochondrial Ferritin Protects Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Neuronal Cell Damage
Guofen Gao, Nan Zhang, Yue-Qi Wang, Qiong Wu, Peng Yu, Zhen-Hua Shi, Xiang-Lin Duan, Bao-Lu Zhao, Wen-Shuang Wu, Yan-Zhong Chang
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (4): 458-470.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2016.1108
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1667KB)

Oxidative stress and iron accumulation are tightly associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is identified as an iron-storage protein located in the mitochondria, and its role in regulation of iron hemeostasis in neurodegenerative diseases has been reported. However, the role of FtMt in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and iron accumulation in neuronal cells has not been studied. Here, we overexpressed FtMt in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and induced oxidative stress by treating with extracellular H2O2. We found that overexpression of FtMt significantly prevented cell death induced by H2O2, particularly the apoptosis-dependent cell death. The protective effects involved inhibiting the generation of cellular reactive oxygen species, sustaining mitochondrial membrane potential, maintaining the level of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, and inhibiting the activation of pro-apoptotic protein caspase 3. We further explored the mechanism of these protective effects and found that FtMt expression markedly altered iron homeostasis of the H2O2 treated cells as compared to that of controls. The FtMt overexpression significantly reduced cellular labile iron pool (LIP) and protected H2O2-induced elevation on LIP. While in H2O2 treated SH-SY5Y cells, the increased iron uptake and reduced iron release, in correlation with levels of DMT1(-IRE) and ferroportin 1, resulted in heavy iron accumulation, the FtMt overexpressing cells didn’t show any significant changes in levels of iron transport proteins and in the level of LIP. These results implicate a neuroprotective role of FtMt on H2O2-induced oxidative stress, which may provide insights into the treatment of iron accumulation associated neurodegenerative diseases.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Aged Mice are More Resistant to Influenza Virus Infection due to Reduced Inflammation and Lung Pathology
Jiao Lu,Xuefeng Duan,Wenming Zhao,Jing Wang,Haoyu Wang,Kai Zhou,Min Fang
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (3): 358-373.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0701
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1553KB)

Immune responses are a double-edged sword. Effective and appropriate immune responses capable of controlling viral infection while also largely preserving tissue integrity, are critical for host survival. Too strong immune responses might result in immune pathology, while too weak immune responses might cause viral persistence. Physiologic ageing is accompanied with a decline in the normal functioning of the immune system, which is termed as "immunosenescence". We show that aged mice (16-19 months old) are more resistant to influenza A virus (IAV) infection than the young mice. Strong immune responses in the young mice after IAV infection result in faster clearance of virus, but also cause severe lung injury and higher mortality rate. While in the aged mice, the delayed and milder immune responses contribute to reduced pulmonary damage, and are still capable to clear the infection even with a slower kinetics, displaying a more resistant phenotype during IAV infection. Hence, our work demonstrates that moderate immune responses as a decline with ageing in the aged mice balance the immune pathology and viral clearance, might be beneficial for the host during certain circumstances. Our results provide important insight to our basic knowledge of immunosenescence and immune defenses to invading pathogens. Further, our results indicate that age factors should be considered when investigating the vaccination and therapeutic strategies for severe IAV infection.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Aging Airways: between Normal and Disease. A Multidimensional Diagnostic Approach by Combining Clinical, Functional, and Imaging Data
Mariaelena Occhipinti,Anna Rita Larici,Lorenzo Bonomo,Raffaele Antonelli Incalzi
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (4): 471-485.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2016.1215
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1578KB)

The lack of data on lung function decline in the aging process as well as the lack of gold standards to define obstructive and restrictive respiratory disease in older people point out the need for a multidimensional assessment and interpretation of the aging airways. By integrating clinical data together with morphologic and morphometric findings clinicians can assess the airways with a more comprehensive perspective, helpful in the interpretation of the “grey zone” between normal aging and disease. This review focuses on the value of a multidimensional approach in the study of the aging airways, including clinical findings, respiratory function tests, and imaging as parts of a whole. Nowadays this multidimensional diagnostic approach can be used in daily clinical practice. In next future, it can be implemented by the analysis of exhaled gases, post-processing imaging techniques, and genetic analysis, that will hopefully reduce the gaps in knowledge of normal aging and airway disease in older people.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Lycium Barbarum: A Traditional Chinese Herb and A Promising Anti-Aging Agent
Yanjie Gao,Yifo Wei,Yuqing Wang,Fang Gao,Zhigang Chen
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (6): 778-791.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0725
Abstract   HTML   PDF (905KB)

Lycium barbarum has been used in China for more than 2,000 years as a traditional medicinal herb and food supplement. Lycium barbarum contains abundant Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs), betaine, phenolics, carotenoids (zeaxanthin and β-carotene), cerebroside, 2-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid (AA-2βG), β-sitosterol, flavonoids and vitamins (in particular, riboflavin, thiamine, and ascorbic acid). LBPs are the primary active components of Lycium barbarum. In this review, we discuss the pharmacological activities of LBPs and other major components. They have been reported to mediate significant anti-aging effects, through antioxidant, immunoregulative, anti-apoptotic activities and reducing DNA damage. Thus, the basic scientific evidence for anti-aging effects of LBPs is already available. However, additional studies are needed to understand mechanisms by which LBPs mediate anti-aging properties. Novel findings from such studies would likely pave the way for the clinical application of traditional chinese medicine Lycium barbarum in modern evidence-based medicine.

Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Anserine/Carnosine Supplementation Preserves Blood Flow in the Prefrontal Brain of Elderly People Carrying APOE e4
Qiong Ding,Kitora Tanigawa,Jun Kaneko,Mamoru Totsuka,Yoshinori Katakura,Etsuko Imabayashi,Hiroshi Matsuda,Tatsuhiro Hisatsune
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (3): 334-345.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0809
Abstract   HTML   PDF (789KB)

In a previously reported double-blind, randomized controlled trial (RCT), we demonstrated that daily supplementation with anserine (750 mg) and carnosine (250 mg) improves brain blood flow and memory function in elderly people. Here, we conducted a sub-analysis of MRI data and test scores from the same RCT to determine whether anserine/carnosine supplementation specifically benefits elderly people carrying the APOE e4 allele, which is a risk gene for accelerated brain aging and for the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease. We collected data from 68 participants aged 65 years or older who received anserine/carnosine supplementation (ACS) or placebo for 12 months. Subjects were assessed at the start and end of the trial using several neuropsychological tests, including the Wechsler Memory Scale-Logical Memory (WMS-LM). We also collected two types of MRI data, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at the start and end of the trial. We found that ACS significantly preserved verbal memory (WMS-LM, F[1,65] = 4.2003, p = 0.0445) and blood flow at frontal areas of the brain (FWEcluster level, p < 0.001). Sub-analysis based on the APOE4 genotype showed a significant preservation of blood flow (p = 0.002, by ASL analysis) and white-matter microstructure (p = 0.003, by DTI analysis) at prefrontal areas in APOE4+ subjects in the active group, while there was no significant difference between APOE4- subjects in the active and placebo groups. The effect of ACS in preserving brain structure and function in elderly people carrying APOE4 should be verified by further studies.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Causes of Death in Chinese Patients with Multiple System Atrophy
LingYu Zhang,Bei Cao,Yutong Zou,Qian-Qian Wei,RuWei Ou,Wanglin Liu,Bi Zhao,Jing Yang,Ying Wu,HuiFang Shang
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (1): 102-108.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0711
Abstract   HTML   PDF (711KB)

The objective of this study was to explore the causes of death in Chinese patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) as well as differences in the cause of death according to sex, subtype, disease onset, and whether the disease was accompanied by nocturnal stridor. A total of 131 MSA patients were enrolled and followed up once every year until their deaths. Clinical information was collected by neurologists, and the cause of death of the MSA patients was obtained from the patients’ relatives or caregivers. The current study included 62 MSA with predominant parkinsonism (MSA-P) and 69 MSA with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C) patients. Median survival time from disease onset to death of the MSA patients was 5.59 years. The most common cause of death was respiratory infection (65.6%). The second most common cause of death was sudden death (14.5%). Other causes included nutritional disorder due to dysphagia (9.2%), urinary tract infection (3.1%), suicide (2.3%), choking (1.5%), cerebrovascular accident (1.5%), myocardial infarction (1.5%), and lymphoma (0.8%). We found that sudden death was more likely to occur in patients with nocturnal stridor than in those without (P<0.001). There were no significant differences in the cause of death according to subtype, sex, or onset symptoms (autonomic failure or motor symptoms). Sudden death is a relatively common cause of death in MSA patients, second only to respiratory infection, especially in patients with nocturnal stridor. The information provided by our study may help to provide better medical care to MSA patients.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Effects of Erythropoietin on Gliogenesis during Cerebral Ischemic/Reperfusion Recovery in Adult Mice
Rongliang Wang,Jincheng Li,Yunxia Duan,Zhen Tao,Haiping Zhao,Yumin Luo
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (4): 410-419.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2016.1209
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1130KB)

Erythropoietin (EPO) promotes oligodendrogenesis and attenuates white matter injury in neonatal rats. However, it is unknown whether this effect extends to adult mice and whether EPO regulate microglia polarization after ischemic stroke. Male adult C57BL/6 mice (25–30g) were subjected to 45 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). EPO (5000 IU/kg) or saline was injected intraperitoneally every other day after reperfusion. Neurological function was evaluated using the rotarod test at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after MCAO. Brain tissue loss volume was determined by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot were also used to assess the severity of white matter injury and phenotypic changes in microglia/macrophages. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected intraperitoneally daily for 1 week to analyze the number of newly proliferating glia cells (oligodendrocytes, microglia, and astrocytes). We found that EPO significantly reduced Brain tissue loss volume, ameliorated white matter injury, and improved neurobehavioral outcomes at 14 days after MCAO (P<0.05). In addition, EPO also increased the number of newly generated oligodendrocytes and attenuated the rapid hypertrophy and hyperplasia of microglia and astrocytes after ischemic stroke (P<0.05). Furthermore, EPO reduced M1 microglia and increased M2 microglia (P<0.05). Taken together, our results suggest that EPO treatment improves white matter integrity after cerebral ischemia, which could be attributed to EPO attenuating gliosis and facilitating the microglial polarization toward the beneficial M2 phenotype to promote oligodendrogenesis.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
The Pathogenesis of Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament
Liang Yan,Rui Gao,Yang Liu,Baorong He,Shemin Lv,Dingjun Hao
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (5): 570-582.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0201
Abstract   HTML   PDF (938KB)

Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is a multi-factorial disease involving an ectopic bone formation of spinal ligaments. It affects 0.8-3.0% aging Asian and 0.1-1.7% aging European Caucasian. The ossified ligament compresses nerve roots in the spinal cord and causes serious neurological problems such as myelopathy and radiculopathy. Research in understanding pathogenesis of OPLL over the past several decades have revealed many genetic and non-genetic factors contributing to the development and progress of OPLL. The characterizations of aberrant signaling of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and the pathological phenotypes of OPLL-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have provided new insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying OPLL. This paper reviews the recent progress in understanding the pathophysiology of OPLL and proposes future research directions on OPLL.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
PARP-1 Inhibition Rescues Short Lifespan in Hyperglycemic C. Elegans And Improves GLP-1 Secretion in Human Cells
Qianghua Xia,Sumei Lu,Julian Ostrovsky,Shana E McCormack,Marni J Falk,Struan F. A Grant
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (1): 17-30.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0230
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1317KB)

TCF7L2 is located at one of the most strongly associated type 2 diabetes loci reported to date. We previously reported that the most abundant member of a specific protein complex to bind across the presumed causal variant at this locus, rs7903146, was poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase type 1 (PARP-1). We analyzed the impact of PARP-1 inhibition on C. elegans health in the setting of hyperglycemia and on glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion in human intestinal cells. Given that high glucose concentrations progressively shorten the lifespan of C. elegans, in part by impacting key well-conserved insulin-modulated signaling pathways, we investigated the effect of PARP-1 inhibition with Olaparib on the lifespan of C. elegans nematodes under varying hyperglycemic conditions. Subsequently, we investigated whether Olaparib treatment had any effect on glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion in the human NCI-H716 intestinal cell line, a model system for the investigation of enteroendocrine function. Treatment with 100uM Olaparib in nematodes exposed to high concentrations of glucose led to significant lifespan rescue. The beneficial lifespan effect of Olaparib appeared to require both PARP-1 and TCF7L2, since treatment had no effect in hyperglycemic conditions in knock-out worm strains for either of these homologs. Further investigation using the NCI-H716 cells revealed that Olaparib significantly enhanced secretion of the incretin, GLP-1, plus the gene expression of TCF7L2, GCG and PC1. These data from studies in both C. elegans and a human cell line suggest that PARP-1 inhibition offers a novel therapeutic avenue to treat type 2 diabetes.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Parity History Determines a Systemic Inflammatory Response to Spread of Ovarian Cancer in Naturally Aged Mice
Ulises Urzua,Carlos Chacon,Luis Lizama,Sebastián Sarmiento,Pía Villalobos,Belén Kroxato,Katherine Marcelain,María-Julieta Gonzalez
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (5): 546-557.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0110
Abstract   HTML   PDF (820KB)

Aging intersects with reproductive senescence in women by promoting a systemic low-grade chronic inflammation that predisposes women to several diseases including ovarian cancer (OC). OC risk at menopause is significantly modified by parity records during prior fertile life. To date, the combined effects of age and parity on the systemic inflammation markers that are particularly relevant to OC initiation and progression at menopause remain largely unknown. Herein, we profiled a panel of circulating cytokines in multiparous versus virgin C57BL/6 female mice at peri-estropausal age and investigated how cytokine levels were modulated by intraperitoneal tumor induction in a syngeneic immunocompetent OC mouse model. Serum FSH, LH and TSH levels increased with age in both groups while prolactin (PRL) was lower in multiparous respect to virgin mice, a finding previously observed in parous women. Serum CCL2, IL-10, IL-5, IL-4, TNF-α, IL1-β and IL-12p70 levels increased with age irrespective of parity status, but were specifically reduced following OC tumor induction only in multiparous mice. Animals developed hemorrhagic ascites and tumor implants in the omental fat band and other intraperitoneal organs by 12 weeks after induction, with multiparous mice showing a significantly extended survival. We conclude that previous parity history counteracts aging-associated systemic inflammation possibly by reducing the immunosuppression that typically allows tumor spread. Results suggest a partial impairment of the M2 shift in tumor-associated macrophages as well as decreased stimulation of regulatory B-cells in aged mice. This long term, tumor-concurrent effect of parity on inflammation markers at menopause would be a contributing factor leading to decreased OC risk.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Aging Systemic Milieu Impairs Outcome after Ischemic Stroke in Rats
Mengxiong Pan,Peng Wang,Chengcai Zheng,Hongxia Zhang,Siyang Lin,Bei Shao,Qichuan Zhuge,Kunlin Jin
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (5): 519-530.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0710
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1568KB)

Compelling evidence indicates that factors in the blood can profoundly reverse aging-related impairments, as exposure of aged mice to young blood rejuvenates adult stem cell function, improves cognition, and ameliorates cardiac hypertrophy. Systemic factors from mice can also extend the life span of a partner exposed to a lethal treatment or disease. These findings suggest that the systemic milieu of a healthy young partner may be beneficial for an aged organism. However, it is unknown whether a healthy young systemic milieu can improve functional recovery after ischemic stroke. Intraperitoneal administration of young plasma into aged rats after ischemic stroke induced by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO) reduced infarct volume and motor impairment, compared with vehicle group. On the contrary, intraperitoneal administration of plasma from aged rats into young ischemic rats worsened brain injury and motor deficits. Using a proteomic approach, we found that haptoglobin levels were significantly increased in serum of aged rats and that intraperitoneal administration of haptoglobin impaired outcome after ischemic stroke in young rats. Our data suggest that the aging systemic milieu plays a critical role in functional outcome after ischemic stroke.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Age-related Impairment of Vascular Structure and Functions
Xianglai Xu,Brian Wang,Changhong Ren,Jiangnan Hu,David A. Greenberg,Tianxiang Chen,Liping Xie,Kunlin Jin
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (5): 590-610.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0430
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1248KB)

Among age-related diseases, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases are major causes of death. Vascular dysfunction is a key characteristic of these diseases wherein age is an independent and essential risk factor. The present work will review morphological alterations of aging vessels in-depth, which includes the discussion of age-related microvessel loss and changes to vasculature involving the capillary basement membrane, intima, media, and adventitia as well as the accompanying vascular dysfunctions arising from these alterations.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Rhizoma Coptidis and Berberine as a Natural Drug to Combat Aging and Aging-Related Diseases via Anti-Oxidation and AMPK Activation
Zhifang Xu,Wei Feng,Qian Shen,Nannan Yu,Kun Yu,Shenjun Wang,Zhigang Chen,Seiji Shioda,Yi Guo
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (6): 760-777.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2016.0620
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1431KB)

Aging is the greatest risk factor for human diseases, as it results in cellular growth arrest, impaired tissue function and metabolism, ultimately impacting life span. Two different mechanisms are thought to be primary causes of aging. One is cumulative DNA damage induced by a perpetuating cycle of oxidative stress; the other is nutrient-sensing adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and rapamycin (mTOR)/ ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) pathways. As the main bioactive component of natural Chinese medicine rhizoma coptidis (RC), berberine has recently been reported to expand life span in Drosophila melanogaster, and attenuate premature cellular senescence. Most components of RC including berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and jatrorrhizine have been found to have beneficial effects on hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and hypertension aging-related diseases. The mechanism of these effects involves multiple cellular kinase and signaling pathways, including anti-oxidation, activation of AMPK signaling and its downstream targets, including mTOR/rpS6, Sirtuin1/ forkhead box transcription factor O3 (FOXO3), nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor-2 (Nrf2), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. Most of these mechanisms converge on AMPK regulation on mitochondrial oxidative stress. Therefore, such evidence supports the possibility that rhizoma coptidis, in particular berberine, is a promising anti-aging natural product, and has pharmaceutical potential in combating aging-related diseases via anti-oxidation and AMPK cellular kinase activation.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Temporal Gene Expression Profiles after Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Mice
Chengjie Zhang,Yanbing Zhu,Song Wang,Zheng Zachory Wei,Michael Qize Jiang,Yongbo Zhang,Yuhualei Pan,Shaoxin Tao,Jimei Li,Ling Wei
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (2): 249-261.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0424
Abstract   HTML   PDF (2155KB)

A cascade of pathological processes is triggered in the lesion area after ischemic stroke. Unfortunately, our understanding of these complicated molecular events is incomplete. In this investigation, we sought to better understand the detailed molecular and inflammatory events occurring after ischemic stroke. RNA-seq technology was used to identify whole gene expression profiles at days (D1, D3, D7, D14, D21) after focal cerebral ischemia in mice. Enrichment analyses based on Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) terms for the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were then analyzed. Inflammation-related genes that were significantly expressed after stroke were selected for analysis and the temporal expression patterns of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory genes were reported. These data illustrated that the number of DEGs increased accumulatively after cerebral ischemia. In summary, there were 1967 DEGs at D1, 2280 DEGs at D3, 2631 DEGs at D7, 5516 DEGs at D14 and 7093 DEGs at D21. The significantly enriched GO terms also increased. 58 GO terms and 18 KEGG pathways were significantly enriched at all inspected time points. We identified 87 DEGs which were functionally related to inflammatory responses. The expression levels of pro-inflammation related genes CD16, CD32, CD86, CD11b, Tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) increased over time and peaked at D14. Anti-inflammation related genes Arginase 1 (Arg1) and Chitinase-like 3 (Ym1) peaked at D1 while IL-10, Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and CD206, which were induced at 1 day after cerebral ischemia, peaked by 7 to 14 days. These gene profile changes were potentially linked to microglia/macrophage phenotype changes and could play a role in astroglial activation. This study supplies new insights and detailed information on the molecular events and pathological mechanisms that occur after experimental ischemic stroke.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
One-Year Readmission Risk and Mortality after Hip Fracture Surgery: A National Population-Based Study in Taiwan
Tien-Ching Lee,Pei-Shan Ho,Hui-Tzu Lin,Mei-Ling Ho,Hsuan-Ti Huang,Je-Ken Chang
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (4): 402-409.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2016.1228
Abstract   HTML   PDF (857KB)

Early readmission following hip fracture (HFx) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We conducted a survival analysis of patients with readmission within 1 year after HFx to elucidate the trend and predictors for readmission. We used Taiwan National Health Insurance Database to recruit HFx patients who underwent operations between 2000 and 2009. Patients < 60 years; with pathological fractures; involved in major traffic accidents; with previous pelvis, femur, and hip operations; or who died during the index admission were excluded. We used the Chi-square test, logistic regression, Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox proportional hazards model to analyze variables, including age, gender, hospital stay duration, index admission time, and comorbidity on readmission. 5,442 subjects (61.2% female) met the criteria with mean age of 78.8 years. Approximately 15% and 43% HFx patients were readmitted within 30 days (early) and between 30 days and 1 year (late) after discharge, respectively. Highest readmission incidence was observed within the first 30 days. Most common causes of readmission in early and late groups were respiratory system diseases and injuries, respectively. Cox model showed male, old age, hospital stay > 9 days, Charlson Comorbidity Index ≥ 1, index admission during 2000–2003, and internal fixation of HFx were independent predictors of readmission. One-year mortality of the early and the late readmission groups was 44.9% and 32.3%, much higher than overall mortality which was 16.8%. Predictive factors for readmission within 1 year included male, old age, comorbidities, and longer hospital stay. One-year mortality in readmitted patients was significantly higher. HFx patients with these factors need careful follow-up, especially within 30 days after discharge.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
The Effects of Baicalin and Baicalein on Cerebral Ischemia: A Review
Wei Liang,Xiaobo Huang,Wenqiang Chen
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (6): 850-867.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0829
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1036KB)

Ischemic stroke, producing a high mortality and morbidity rate, is a common clinical disease. Enhancing the prevention and control of ischemic stroke is particularly important. Baicalin and its aglycon baicalein are flavonoids extracted from Scutellaria baicalensis, an important traditional Chinese herb. In recent years, a growing body of evidences has shown that baicalin and baicalein could be effective in the treatment of cerebral ischemia. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that baicalin could penetrate the blood-brain barrier and distribute in cerebral nuclei. Through a variety of in vitro and in vivo models of ischemic neuronal injury, numerous studies have demonstrated that baicalin and baicalein have salutary effect for neuroprotection. Especially, the studies on the pharmacological mechanism showed that baicalin and baicalein have several pharmacological activities, which include antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-excitotoxicity effects, protection of the mitochondria, promoting neuronal protective factors expression and adult neurogenesis effects and many more. This review focuses on the neuroprotective effects of baicalin and baicalein in ischemia or stroke-induced neuronal cell death. We aimed at collecting all important information regarding the neuroprotective effect and its pharmacological mechanism of baicalin and baicalein in various in vivo and in vitro experimental models of ischemic neuronal injury.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Promoting Neurovascular Recovery in Aged Mice after Ischemic Stroke - Prophylactic Effect of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids
Mengfei Cai,Wenting Zhang,Zhongfang Weng,R. Anne Stetler,Xiaoyan Jiang,Yejie Shi,Yanqin Gao,Jun Chen
Aging and Disease    2017, 8 (5): 531-545.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0520
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1663KB)

The aged population is among the highest at risk for ischemic stroke, yet most stroke patients of advanced ages (>80 years) are excluded from access to thrombolytic treatment by tissue plasminogen activator, the only FDA approved pharmacological therapy for stroke victims. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) robustly alleviate ischemic brain injury in young adult rodents, but have not yet been studied in aged animals. This study investigated whether chronic dietary supplementation of n-3 PUFAs protects aging brain against cerebral ischemia and improves long-term neurological outcomes. Aged (18-month-old) mice were administered n-3 PUFA-enriched fish oil in daily chow for 3 months before and up to 8 weeks after 45 minutes of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Sensorimotor outcomes were assessed by cylinder test and corner test up to 35 days and brain repair dynamics evaluated immunohistologically up to 56 days after tMCAO. Mice receiving dietary supplementation of n-3 PUFAs for 3 months showed significant increases in brain ratio of n-3/n-6 PUFA contents, and markedly reduced long-term sensorimotor deficits and chronic ischemic brain tissue loss after tMCAO. Mechanistically, n-3 PUFAs robustly promoted post-ischemic angiogenesis and neurogenesis, and enhanced white matter integrity after tMCAO. The Pearson linear regression analysis revealed that the enhancement of neurogenesis and white matter integrity both correlated positively with improved sensorimotor activities after tMCAO. This study demonstrates that prophylactic dietary supplementation of n-3 PUFAs effectively improves long-term stroke outcomes in aged mice, perhaps by promoting post-stroke brain repair processes such as angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and white matter restoration.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
The Prevalence of Frailty and its Associated Factors in Japanese Hemodialysis Patients
Hidemi Takeuchi,Haruhito A. Uchida,Yuki Kakio,Yuka Okuyama,Michihiro Okuyama,Ryoko Umebayashi,Kentaro Wada,Hitoshi Sugiyama,Ken Sugimoto,Hiromi Rakugi,Jun Wada
Aging and Disease    2018, 9 (2): 192-207.   DOI: 10.14336/AD.2017.0429
Abstract   HTML   PDF (1251KB)

The population undergoing dialysis is aging worldwide, particularly in Japan. The clinical condition of frailty is the most problematic expression in the elderly population. Potential pathophysiological factors of frailty present in patients with CKD and are accentuated in patients with ESRD. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and predictors of frailty in Japanese HD patients. This study was a multicenter, cross-sectional and observational investigation conducted at 6 institutions. To evaluate frailty, the modified Fried’s frailty phenotype adjusted for Japanese as the self-reported questionnaire was used. Of the 542 patients visiting each institution, 388 were enrolled in this study. In total, 26.0% of participants were categorized as not-frailty, 52.6% as pre-frailty and 21.4% as frailty. The prevalence of frailty increased steadily with age and was more prevalent in females than in males and the subjects with frailty received polypharmacy. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the factors independently associated with frailty were the following: female gender (odds ratio [OR] = 3.661, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.398-9.588), age (OR = 1.065, 95% CI 1.014-1.119), age ≥ 75 years old (OR = 4.892, 95% CI 1.715-13.955), body mass index (BMI) < 18.5 (OR = 0.110, 95% CI 0.0293-0.416), number of medications being taken (OR = 1.351, 95% CI 1.163-1.570), diabetes mellitus (DM) (OR = 2.765, 95% CI 1.081-7.071) and MNA-SF ≤ 11 (OR = 7.405, 95% CI 2.732-20.072). Frailty was associated with the accumulation of risk factors. The prevalence of frailty in Japanese patients with HD was relatively lower than that previously reported in Western developed countries; however, it was extremely high compared to the general population regardless of age. Our findings suggest that frailty might be associated with an increase in the prevalence of adverse health outcomes in patients with HD.

Table and Figures | Reference | Related Articles | Metrics
Copyright © 2014 Aging and Disease, All Rights Reserved.
Address: Aging and Disease Editorial Office 3400 Camp Bowie Boulevard Fort Worth, TX76106 USA
Fax: (817) 735-0408 E-mail: editorial@aginganddisease.org
Powered by Beijing Magtech Co. Ltd